The Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation Reports Increase in Canadian Collection Numbers

Canadian commitment to environmental program increases in the first six months of 2005

TORONTO, July 25, 2005 – The nonprofit Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC) today announced its collection data for the first six months of 2005, reporting the collection of more than 180 thousand pounds (82,512 kilograms or 82.5 tonnes) of rechargeable batteries in Canada, an increase of 8.5 percent from 2004.

Call2Recycle is the nation?s most comprehensive rechargeable battery and cellphone recycling program featuring retail and community collection locations across Canada where consumers can drop off used rechargeable batteries and old cellphones. Through RBRC?s recycling network, reusable metals from Nickel-Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Lithium Ion (Li-ion), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) and Small Sealed Lead (Pb) batteries are recovered and recycled to make new products such as new batteries and stainless steel. Cell phones collected through the Call2Recycle program are recycled or refurbished and resold, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting national charities.

?As consumers grow increasingly reliant on the use of wireless products, so does the number of rechargeable batteries that can and should be recycled,? said Ralph Millard, Executive Vice President, RBRC. ?As we continue to educate consumers and program participants on the importance and ease of recycling rechargeable batteries and cellphones, we hope that the numbers will continue to increase in
the next six months.?

The increase in collection numbers can in part be attributed to the recent efforts by the RBRC including:

  • Montréal Fire Departments? participation. Sixty-five Montréal fire stations signed on as active collection sites for the Call2Recycle program. Program supporter, Guy Lafleur of Montréal Canadiens? fame, was on-hand for the program launch event.

  • All associated fees waived for businesses. Businesses need no longer pay for the shipping of rechargeable batteries and cellphones collected at the workplace. Once registered, participants receive a free shipment of collection boxes that includes pre-paid shipment, pre-addressed shipping labels, safety instructions and plastic bags for each used rechargeable battery and cellphone.

  • Oldtimers? Hockey Challenge 2005 Sponsorship. RBRC was proud to support the Western Canadian road tour of the Oldtimers? Hockey Challenge 2005 where Guy Lafleur and other Canadian Hockey legends played hockey with local teams in such cities as Edmonton, Vancouver, Calgary, Saskatoon and Winnipeg.

  • RRFB Nova Scotia Mobius Environmental Award. Received the ?Industry Steward of the Year? award at the 7th Annual Mobius Environmental Awards presented by the Nova Scotia Resource Recovery Fund Board. Held this year at the Brightwood Golf and Country Club in Dartmouth, the Mobius Environmental Awards are given in recognition of Nova Scotians who have made a significant contribution toward protecting the environment.

For more information or to find the nearest participating drop-off location, call 1-877-2-RECYCLE or go online to test.us.call2recycle.org.

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About Call2Recycle®
Call2Recycle is the industry?s first and only product stewardship program for rechargeable batteries. The nonprofit program is administered by the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC), a public service organization dedicated to rechargeable battery recycling. There are more than 30,000 Call2Recycle drop-off locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. More than 175 manufacturers and marketers of portable rechargeable batteries and products show their commitment to conserve natural resources and prevent rechargeable batteries from entering the solid waste stream by funding the Call2Recycle program. In pursuit of its mission, Call2Recycle also collects old cellphones, which are either recycled or refurbished and resold when possible with a portion of the proceeds benefiting select charities. For more information, call 877-2-RECYCLE or visit test.us.call2recycle.org.

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